Category Archives: Impulse Control

Training Rattlesnake Avoidance the Force Free Way!

Pam’s Dog Academy was invited to Pleasanton, CA by Dodger’s Paws owned by Christine Salazar to do a 2 day Rattlesnake Avoidance Training Seminar.

It was a wonderful weekend…  Dogs learned to focus and listen to their owners in addition to learning to avoid rattlesnakes through sight, scent, sound and movement.  With this training the sight, sound and or scent of the rattlesnake becomes the cue and the handler does not need to be present for the dog to understand to move away from the rattlesnake or any dangerous thing you would like your dog to avoid.

A few behaviors taught in my program:

Attention Games

Impulse Control Games

Body Blocking Trained as a Behavior and other Safety Games

Leash Walking Skills and Games

Stay Games

Using Tricks and Agility Behaviors to keep your dog safe or move to safety…

Using the old cue new cue method to teach dogs to move away from snakes…

Desensitizing dogs to avoid and ignore moving objects which could be used for any animal, skateboard, bike, car, etc…

Recall Games

and SO MUCH MORE!

In this seminar I teach attendees how to tell the difference between venomous and non-venomous snakes, rattlesnake behavior, rattlesnake fencing, and more.

We had 12 dogs and all did an outstanding job.  The best part was that not one dog was punished and were praised/rewarded for making right choices.

It was simply an amazing weekend!

If you would like to learn how to train dogs to avoid rattlesnakes using force free methods, please contact Pamela Johnson at pamsdogacademy@gmail.com.  I would be happy to do a seminar and or train your trainers.

Also, keep an eye out for my “Positive Rattlesnake Avoidance Training and Safety Program” DVD coming out through Tawzer Dog, soon.

Here is a link to a recorded webinar that Pamela Johnson did through the PPG (Pet Professional Guild) on Training Rattlesnake Avoidance the Force Free Way…  http://www.petprofessionalguild.com/event-1913569

Pam’s Dog Academy was also quoted and mentioned in the Whole Dog Journal: http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/18_5/features/Snake-Aversion-Without-Shock_21208-1.html

Here are just a few amazing shots of some of the dogs at the seminar.  They were all completely focused and awesome!

Have fun training your dog!

Pamela Johnson, B.S., M.A., CPDT-KA and owner of Pam’s Dog Academy

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Grass Field of Dreams!

Introduction
Pamela Johnson owner of Pam’s Dog Academy is a dog trainer and educator with a B.S. degree in Kinesiology and a M.A in Education Curriculum Development. As a full time middle school PE teacher, Pamela feels that many of the skills she uses to teach children transfer nicely to training dogs.

Her passion is using FORCE FREE training methods for behavior modification, as well as training complex behaviors and tricks.

She thrives on the challenge of coming up with creative new ways to train dogs.

Pamela believes that every dog she works with teaches her more about training, patience and, most importantly, to be a better person.

Pamela traveled to Vancouver with Emily Larlham to team-teach a Canine Freestyle seminar, and has taught multiple dog training seminars in North America.

She is known around the world for her training videos on her Youtube channel “pamelamarxsen.” Here she posts free tutorial videos in order that more people may discover the magic of progressive reinforcement training!

Her business Pam’s Dog Training Academy is based in San Diego, California. She is a CPDT-KA, a professional member of the APDT as well as the PPG.
What We Need & What You Get

Pam’s Dog Academy has a new training facility that is in need of a grass field. We currently have a horse riding arena that is dirt and will be the perfect place to host seminars, have group classes and dog sports camps. However, it is not going to be cheap.

We will need $6000 for sprinkler systems, drainage and grass.
I am offering many perks to reward you for your generous donation to this project! ebooks, DVDs, Online Classes and One on One Coaching.
If we are not able to raise the entire $6000, we plan on saving the money and putting it in a special account that will be specifically for the grass field. If enough is raised for us to get the project started, we will proceed in phases.
If you would like something other than the perk offered, please feel free to email me and I will see what I can do.
The Impact

This project will not only impact those that are able to travel to group/private classes, dog camp or seminars, but I will be able to produce an unlimited amount of FREE YouTube “How to” Clicker Dog Training videos. These videos will range from dog sports, tricks, behavior modification and so much more.

You can view some of my YouTube videos at www.YouTube.com/pamelamarxsen
Pam has been helping people train their dogs with FREE advice through email, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and over the telephone. This will not stop because Pam believes in helping as many dogs and their humans as possible.
Other Ways You Can Help

Pam’s Dog Academy understands that times can be tough and not everyone will able to donate to this project. If this is the case, we 100% understand! If you are not able to contribute financially, we would really appreciate it if you could spread the word by sharing information about this project to those that might be able to help and support us financially.

Please feel free to share through social media, email and through word of mouth.
Indiegogo also has many share tools!

Separation Training Tips by Emily Larlham

Separation training tips

Posted on August 1, 2013 by Emily Larlham

1. Leave your dog alone while you are home

This teaches the dog to enjoy being alone while it is not associated only with you leaving the house.   You can use baby gates and pens to keep your dog in one part of the house while you are in another.   You can give your dog food puzzles, chews, and hide treats for your dog to find while you are in another part of the house to make the alone time highly reinforcing.

2. Never let your dog know if you are home or not when leaving your dog alone

If you have a severely anxious dog, you can keep your dog in one part of the house and play music outside the room so your dog cannot focus on the sounds you make and deduce from them whether you are home or not.  In conjunction with this, you can also repeatedly open and close doors loudly and go in and out of the front door so that your dog never knows whether you are in the house or not.

3. Leave your dog when your dog has just settled

It’s a good idea to let your dog settle down before you leave your dog, if you are still working on separation training.  If you take your dog out to pee, do a training session, or play with him just before you leave the house, it could actually cause your dog to be more stressed when you leave him. This is because there becomes a huge contrast between what it’s like when you are home and when you are gone.  Instead, wait a couple minutes for your dog to settle down before leaving.

4. Make sure to give your dog enough mental and physical exercise

Dogs sleep most of the day.  If you give your dog mental and physical stimulation before you leave for work, the dog will be more likely to want to sleep during the time that you are away.  When a dog doesn’t get enough exercise, the dog will be more likely to be awake and looking for things to do in your absence.

5. Experiment with what makes your dog feel more comfortable

For some dogs, less room to roam when home alone makes them more comfortable, while others feel more comfortable with more space.  Some dogs find the TV or radio on soothing, while others find it more stressful.  You can also experiment with using a Dog Appeasing Pheromone collar or spray, as well as other herbal remedies.  I have seen natural remedies have both extreme effects as well as what seems like no effect whatsoever.

6. Spy on your dog

 Spy on your dog or Skype your dog using modern technology while your dog is “alone” for the first time with free range to your stuff.  Even if your dog might learn that he can make you “come back” that one time you rush in, it will stop the dog from practicing and finding destructive behavior like destroying your $5,000 couch reinforcing in your absence.  It’s easier to go back a step in your separation training plan, but not so easy to teach your dog not to eat your house when you are not around to stop him.

7. Dogs need choices

I recommend teaching your dog to like being in a crate for many beneficial reasons, however being left alone during the day is not one of them.  I believe that dogs need to make choices throughout the day and only being able to lie down and turn around when inside a create can cause behavioral side effects.

Instead of using a crate for alone time, if you have a dog that could potentially be destructive, you can create a safe pen for your dog to stay in or create a dog-safe room.

Here is a blog on how to create an escape-proof exercise pen:

http://clicktreat.blogspot.se/2009/06/making-escape-proof-x-pen.html

8. Don’t pay attention to your dog when leaving or arriving

Don’t make leaving or coming home of such importance to your dog.  Your dog should want to keep dozing in the sun as you exit to go off to work, not jump up and start to panic.

For dogs that are anxious about being alone, we need to put our own desires of wanting a happy greeting on our arrival home or a snuggle on our departure aside and concentrate on building a calm and more independent dog.  To help your dog to be more independent, ignore him upon entering and leaving your house or the room your dog is in.  You can save your hellos for later.  For example, half an hour after returning you can get down on your knees and excite your dog as much as your want.  By putting time between when you come home and when you lavish attention on your dog, you will not create a huge contrast between the time your dog spent alone and when you walk through the door.

In my opinion, dogs are highly intelligent beings and are conscious of whether they are being looked at or not, in a similar way to how people are.   Imagine you are looking through the window at someone on the street, and do not feel self-aware.  Suddenly, the person on the street looks through the window and stares at you.  This immediately makes you feel self-aware.

Now I do not now if this happens to dogs, but in my humble opinion I feel it could be possible.  In theory, if your dog is sitting in a pen in a room, and if you walk around the room and pretend you cannot see your dog, your dog will be less anxious than if you make eye contact with your dog.  When working on separation training, pretend your dog is invisible.  Even when you go over to drop a treat into your dog’s pen, or let the dog out, try to pretend you cannot see the dog as you are doing it.  Obviously do not always pretend you cannot see your dog.  Just do it when you think looking at your dog will make him overly excited.

9. Try medication for severe anxiety

If you have a severely anxious dog and you have tried everything you possibly can, visit your vet to see if your dog might benefit from medication.  The point of giving the medication would be to get your dog calm enough to train your dog and then wean the dog off the medication as soon as possible.